Søren Kierkegaard

Søren Aabye Kierkegaard (5 May 1813 – 11 November 1855)
 
He was a Danish philosopher, theologian, poet, social critic, and religious author who are widely considered to be the first existentialist philosopher. He wrote critical texts on organized religion, morality, ethics, psychology and philosophy of religion, displaying a fondness for metaphor, irony and parables. Much of his philosophical work deals with the issues of how one lives as a “single individual”, giving priority to concrete human reality over abstract thinking, and highlighting the importance of personal choice and commitment. He was a fierce critic of idealist intellectuals and philosophers of his time, such as Swedenborg, Hegel, Goethe, Fichte, Schelling, Schegel and Hans Christian Andersen. 
 
Here is his wonderful essay on helping others, written in 1859. This is still valid 150 years later and a must
for all coaches, therapists,  and helpers. It’s in English and in his own language, Danish.
 

English On help

Danish Om at hjælpe

4 responses to “Søren Kierkegaard

  1. Lovely essay on “help”. A must read for all people.

  2. Yes Pat, sooo right… He has written an enormous lot of stuff, was very productive. Here is another shortie from him from 1853!!!

    “To dare is to risk losing your foothold for a moment.
    Not to dare is to risk losing yourself”

  3. What Pat said…. So basic, true, and important. Thanks, Per.

  4. Anita: You are soooo welcome. I will bring some more Kierkegaard later. There is LOT’S of him to pick from. The most amazing is how much he was “before his time”.. You know 150 years ago he wrote all this incredible stuff.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s